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Anna's lemon tart recipe

Anna's lemon tart recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Pies and tarts
  • Sweet pies and tarts
  • Fruit pies and tarts
  • Lemon pies and tarts

I absolutely love lemon tart! I borrowed this recipe from my friend, who is a great cook. The tart tastes best when it has chilled in the fridge overnight, but it is really hard to wait that long!

13 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • For the pastry
  • 140g plain flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 75g cold butter, diced
  • ice cold water, as needed
  • For the filling
  • 475ml milk
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 1 packet vanilla sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cornflour
  • 3 egg yolks, lightly beaten
  • juice of 3 lemons
  • zest of 2 lemons

MethodPrep:30min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:1hr

    For the pastry:

  1. In the bowl of a mixer, combine flour and salt. With the dough/pasrty stirring attachment mix in butter and add a little bit of ice cold water at a time, until mixture forms a ball. (Alternatively you can mix together using your hands to form fine breadcrumbs and then add water and knead into a pastry.)
  2. Grease a 23cm springform tart tin. Place the pastry between two sheets of baking parchment and roll out into a circle, that is big enough to line the tart tin including the sides with a little over hang. Transfer to the prepared tin and gently press into the sides. Place in the freezer while you prepare the filling.
  3. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4.
  4. For the filling:

  5. In a metal bowl combine milk, caster sugar, vanilla sugar and cornflour. Add egg yolks and stir well. Place bowl floating in a saucepan with boiling water (or in a double boiler) and beat for 10 to 15 minutes, until the mixture thickens. Take off the heat and stir in lemon juice and zest. Pour filling onto the pastry crust
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 25 minutes, until the filling is set. If the dough gets too dark, before the filling is set, cover tart with aluminium foil and continue baking. Remove from the heat, trim the edges if necessary and allow to cool fully. Chill prior to serving.

Vanilla sugar

Vanilla sugar is generally available in supermarkets nowadays, however, in a pinch substitute 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract to every 2 teaspoons vanilla sugar.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3)


Anna's Tomato Tart

Place the flour and 1 teaspoon of salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Add the butter and pulse 12 to 15 times, until the butter is the size of peas. Add the egg yolks and pulse a few times to combine. With the motor running, add the ice water through the feed tube and pulse until the dough starts to come together. Dump onto a floured board and roll it into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Meanwhile, place the tomatoes in a large bowl. Put the parsley, basil, garlic, thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade and process until finely minced. With the processor running, pour the olive oil down the feed tube and process until combined. Pour the mixture over the tomatoes and toss gently. Set aside.

On a well-floured board, roll the dough out to an 11 × 17-inch rectangle and transfer it to the prepared sheet pan. Don’t worry if it doesn’t fit exactly you want it to cover most of the bottom of the pan but it can be a little rough on the sides. Place a second sheet pan directly on the pastry and bake for 15 minutes. (You can also line the pastry with foil and fill it with dried beans.) Remove the top sheet pan (or the beans and foil). Using a dinner fork, pierce the pastry in many places. Bake for another 8 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned. Check the pastry during baking pierce any spots that bubble up. Allow the crust to cool for 15 minutes.

Lower the oven to 375 degrees. Brush the mustard on the crust with a pastry brush. Sprinkle a thick even layer of Gruyère on the pastry, reserving ½ cup for the top, and sprinkle with the ½ cup of Parmesan. Place overlapping tomatoes in rows on top. If there is a little garlic and herb mixture in the bowl, sprinkle it over the tomatoes, but if there is liquid in the bowl, strain it through a very-fine-mesh strainer, discard the liquid, and sprinkle the garlic and herb mixture on the tomatoes. Sprinkle the reserved ½ cup of Gruyère and the remaining 2 tablespoons of Parmesan on top. Bake for 30 minutes.

Cool slightly, cut into squares, and serve warm or at room temperature.

Copyright 2016, Cooking for Jeffrey, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, All Rights Reserved


Lemon Tart (Tarte au Citron)

All that know me understand that anything chocolate is my favorite dessert, but I have been known to appreciate lemon desserts more and more over the years. As such, I decided to attempt doing the delicious tarte au citron recipe found in Anna’s cookbook. It was easy enough to make, especially once the tart shell (Part I) was done. Part II essentially consists in mixing all the other ingredients together and pouring into the tart shell, which I love! Simplicity at its best. However, one main problem that I had when following the tart shell recipe is a notorious problem that I always face when making tarts: the dough shrank while baking! Gasp! It is quite frustrating indeed to roll out and lay out the dough perfectly, trim the edges while making sure that the dough is not stretched to the top of the pan to then have it shrink in your oven. I even followed other bakers’ advice about making holes with a fork at the bottom of the dough to let it breathe and prevent bubble formation, as well as pressing down the dough with pie weights, but sadly my dough still shrank. I believe that this is a mystical phenomenon that I shall never understand. Am I not letting the dough rest enough before rolling? Too much? Letting the rolled-our dough chill too long in the pan? Maybe one day I will figure this whole “tart thing” out.

  • 1 recipe Sable Tart Shell
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2/3 cup whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) fresh lemon juice

In any case, the point that I was getting at is that since the dough shrank considerably, the baked tart shell was less high than expected, so I was not able to put all the delicious lemon filling in the tart shell for fear of overflowing. Nonetheless, once the tart was out of the oven and cooled completely my boyfriend and I had a taste and it was delightful. Citrus-y, light and yet packed with flavor. Quite good indeed. Due to the aforementioned problem the filling-to-crust ratio was much lower than I would have prefered, but the lemon tart as a whole still tasted very good, especially considering the few steps that are required to make it. Now if only I could figure out how to make the dough stay where it is… the world of lemon tarts would be much more delectable.


Anna's lemon tart recipe - Recipes

Spring is here! And to me, spring = rhubarb!

This is a simple, delicious tart that really satisfies a light dessert craving.

It has a crisp lemon crust, with a whipped cream rhubarb filling. and is topped with a layer of homemade strawberry freezer jam. So good!

Rhubarb Fool Tart Recipe

Ingredients:
4 cups rhubarb, cut into 1" pieces
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 cup butter
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1 3/4 cups flour
1/4 cup sugar
pinch of salt
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup freezer jam (strawberry, raspberry or blackberry)

Directions:
For the crust: Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Melt the butter, stir in the lemon zest and let stand for a few minutes.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, 1/4 cup of sugar, and salt. Pour the butter mixture into the flour mixture slowly, stirring with a fork, until the dough begins to come together when you press a small bit together with your fingers.

Dump the dough mixture into an 11" tart pan with a removable bottom and press firmly with your fingertips until it is evenly distributed over the sides and bottom of the pan.

Bake for 20 minutes, or until light golden brown. Let cool completely, and then place into the fridge until you are ready to fill.

For the filling: In a saucepan, place the rhubarb, 1 cup sugar and lemon juice. Cook over medium heat until the rhubarb is tender.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the rhubarb from the pan and place into your food processor or blender (leaving most of the liquid behind). Puree until relatively smooth, then transfer to a small bowl and refrigerate for at least an hour, or until well chilled.

About an hour before serving the tart, whip the heavy whipping cream. Gently fold in the chilled rhubarb puree. Remove the edge of the pan from the tart shell, and place the crust on a platter or cake stand. Fill with the rhubarb cream mixture. Return to the fridge to chill and set for about an hour before serving. Spoon the freezer jam over the top, and serve with more fresh berries, if you have them!


Lemon Pie

Lemon pie is often considered a Southern confection, conjuring up images of plantation parties with lovely slices of the sky-high pie served on fancy china. Others may think of it as a Diner restaurant staple, a featured highlight in the revolving glass dessert case alongside other luscious treats such as cream puffs, éclairs and cheesecake.

What many folks don’t know is that lemon meringue pie is actually a Philadelphia invention born out of the Victorian-era, courtesy of Mrs. Elizabeth Goodfellow, a 19th century pastry shop proprietress who ran America’s first cooking school.

This classic pie of contrasting sweet-tart layers evolved from one of Mrs. Goodfellow’s signature desserts, a rich lemon pudding. At some point she cleverly thought to top her famous pudding with fluffy meringue. Although there are recipes for decorating cakes, tarts, and custards with sweetened and flavored egg whites starting in the 1600s, adding meringue to a pudding (pie) doesn’t appear until the nineteenth century.

Since Mrs. Goodfellow’s lemon custard recipe calls for the yolks of ten eggs rather than allowing the whites go to waste, she likely decided to resourcefully whip them with sugar to create a meringue for the top. Perhaps the success of this combination prompted her to accent her lemon pudding with the same topping, and voilà – lemon meringue pie was born!

Throughout the mid-19th century, domestic goddess Eliza Leslie (who had studied under Mrs. Goodfellow’s tutelage) began familiarizing Americans with the concept of meringue-topped puddings via her recipes. In her 1847 cookbook, The Lady’s Receipt-Book: A Useful Companion for Large or Small Families, she says: “Any very nice baked pudding will be improved by covering the surface with a meringue.”

By the 1860s, lemon meringue pie recipes began popping up in cookbooks nationwide, including Common Sense in The Household – A Manual of Practical Housewifery by Marion Harland and The Godey’s Lady’s Book Receipts and Household Hints by Sarah Annie Frost. Although sometimes called iced lemon pie, lemon cream pie, or lemon custard pie, they all featured a meringue topping. In fact, lemon custard pie was a favorite of Abraham Lincoln.

Other lemon pie iterations emerged where lemons were sliced like in an apple pie, and sometimes a top crust was added. One version that became a Southern specialty is lemon chess pie, kind of a fusion between pudding and cheesecake. But the most popular style eventually evolved into a pie of layers. The contrasting texture of a slightly crispy shell covering very sweet pillowy meringue balances the tart, thick, custardy lemon filling perfectly. The flaky pastry crust holds it all together.

The recipes in Anna Maxwell’s journal perfectly illustrate the developments and changes that were happening to lemon pie in the latter part of the 19th century. Her diary features four different lemon pie recipes – two with a meringue topping and two without – although all are labeled simply “Lemon Pie.”

I decided to try to replicate the two that included the meringue topping. Here’s the recipe for the first one:

LEMON PIE – Take one lemon, grate the rind, squeeze the juice and chop the pulp very fine a teacupful of sugar the yolks of two eggs beat well together, and add one cup of sweet milk bake immediately beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, with two tablespoonfuls of sugar spread on the pie when done, and put back in the oven to brown.

The first thing I noticed about this recipe is that it uses only two eggs, so I was a little skeptical that it would create the high layers we associate with lemon pie today. Also, it didn’t list any flour or cornstarch as a thickener, although I surmised this was the purpose of the egg yolks and lemon pulp. I followed the recipe directions, using a cup of sugar for the teacupful, and just regular milk for sweet milk (my research determined this is just a way to distinguish regular milk from sour milk, often used in baking for its acidic qualities).

Since the recipe does not call for cooking the mixture beforehand in order to develop a custardy texture, it was rather watery when I popped it in the oven. I had to bake it for almost an hour to get it to set, thus causing the crust to burn a little. (Eventually I placed some aluminum foil around the edges as a shield).

Once it cooled, the lemon layer solidified, it just wasn’t very high. I then made the meringue, but using just two egg whites didn’t yield a huge amount, so as a topping it was relatively thin, and not very attractive! However, it did taste good, and I even tried it out on some folks who are huge lemon meringue pie fans, and they thought it was fine. So, although it was okay, I think with a few tweaks it could work even better – maybe a couple more eggs and a tablespoon or so of flour or cornstarch to help firm up the lemon filling.

Some puddings and pies from this timeframe called for sponge cake as a thickener, so this is another option. In fact, one of the lemon pie recipes in Anna’s diary (without meringue) says to “stiffen with stale sponge cake.”

The other lemon pie recipe I tried was attributed to a “Mrs. McN.” It was originally “lemon pies,” with the “s” at the end of pie crossed out, so I guess at some point it was designed to make more than one (another common occurrence in the 19th century – many recipes were written to make more than one pie at a time). However, I found the ingredients were perfect for just one pie:

Lemon Pies – Grate the rinds of three lemons, and the juice of one. 8 tablespoons of sugar, the yolks of six eggs, 1 tablespoon of flour, 6 of sugar 1 cup of cream. Line the pans with crusts and pour in the mixture and bake. Take the six whites of the eggs and six tablespoons of sugar mixed well together and after the pies are baked spread it over them and return to the oven until brown.

This recipe turned out much better than the first. I think the inclusion of one tablespoon of flour helped. The lemon filling gelled nicely after baking at 350 for about a half hour. It was shiny and glossy – the consistency of rich custard. I followed the directions for making the meringue and put it back in the oven to brown. After about 10 minutes it had developed the characteristic toasted look I was seeking. Success!

My “taste testers” loved it – one comment was just that was a little thicker and more “custardy” than most lemon meringue pies today – not a bad thing, just different. I thought it had the perfect balance of sweet and tart, and definitely has a rich and decadent look and feel on the palate. I can easily see this version becoming my “go-to” lemon pie recipe, and look forward to making it again!


Chef Ana’s Italian Crostata Recipe

Ingredients
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 stick of butter (8 tblsp) chilled and diced into small pieces
1 egg and 1 egg yolk
Juice of ½ lemon
Pinch of salt
Splash of vanilla (optional)
8-12 ounces of your favorite homemade jam (I love fig jam with orange zest in this tart)
9-12 inch tart or pie pan
Directions
In a large bowl, lightly mix together all the ingredients with a fork and then using your hands, work the mixture to form a dough.
Once the dough is formed, wrap in plastic wrap and form it into a flat circle. Refrigerate for about 15-30 minutes.
Pre-heat the oven to 350F.
Divide the dough into ¼ and 3/4 pieces. The ¼ piece will be the lattice on top.
Roll out the larger piece of dough into a circle, large enough to fit in your tart or pie pan.
Now take the rolled dough and press it evenly into the pan. Using a fork, pierce the bottom of the dough several times. This will keep the dough from puffing up during baking.
Spread the jam evenly on the tart dough, leaving a little room around the edges for the top crust.
Roll out the remaining dough and cut into even strips with a pasta cutter or small knife. If the dough becomes too fragile, sometimes I roll pieces into long sticks (just like when we were kids playing with play dough) and then use those long stick pieces to create a lattice top on the crostata. As an option: let the kids get creative and use little cookie cutters to cut shapes to place on top of the crostata.
Bake the crostata for about 30-35 minutes or until the crust is golden. Let the crostata cool for about 5 minutes before serving.

*If doubling the recipe, this crostata can be made in a baking sheet pan using the same method.


Fresh lemon pudding

You know that moment when you are standing at the stove whisking and whisking and whisking… for what feels like forever… and then all of sudden the sugar and eggs and milk that you are stirring become perfectly thick and luscious on your spoon?

That moment is why I love to cook.

I love the feeling of taking simple ingredients that may even seem boring on their own, combining them and ending up with something utterly different and amazing.

Like this fresh creamy lemon pudding.

Sugar, milk, eggs, lemon… simple, yet beautiful ingredients… that together become a luxurious thick, creamy, tart and sweet lemon pudding. Perfect for a refreshing treat after a rich winter’s meal!

(Now, if you’re like me… the words lemon & pudding together just don’t seem to bring up a mental image of anything amazing.

But please, please ignore those thoughts and make this pudding. If you like lemon… you will love this pudding! I promise!! It’s like perfect lemon curd, lightened with cream, perfectly sweet and tart at the same time!)

I can’t wait to make this lemon pudding in the summer and eat it with a big bowl of fresh, ripe strawberries. I’m drooling just thinking about it!

Fresh Lemon Pudding Recipe
adapted from Luscious Lemon Desserts
this recipes makes 4 servings and uses 2 large lemons

Ingredients:
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 cups lowfat milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons lemon zest (from two large lemons)
3 large egg yolks, lightly stirred
1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter, softened

Directions:
In a medium, heavy saucepan, whisk together the sugar and cornstarch. Whisk in the milk, cream, lemon zest and egg yolks until combined.

Turn the heat on to medium and cook, stirring frequently at first and constantly at the end, until the mixture thickens. (Thick enough… if you dip a spoon in the mixture, hold it upright and then draw your finger across the back of it, the mixture should not drip back down the spoon covering the line you drew!).

Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the lemon juice and butter until smooth.

Pour the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve and then pour into a large bowl or individual serving dishes.

Let cool to room temperature and then place in the fridge to chill and set for at least 2 hours or up to a day (covered with plastic wrap if you are chilling for longer than a few hours!).

Serve with fresh raspberries, smashed raspberries or raspberry freezer jam. Or a bit of freshly whipped cream if you’d like!


This Tomato Tart Is So Easy, I Can Tell You How to Make It Over the Phone

The funny thing about working at a food magazine is that everyone you know starts to think of you as their personal food concierge. At around 4:45 p.m. every day, my group chats will start going off with things like, “What should I make for dinner tonight? I have two eggplants, a cucumber that’s about to go bad, and some leftover grains.” (P.S.: Make this). Or, “My uncle is coming to town and staying in Brooklyn Heights. Got any recs?” (P.S.: That answer is going to be The Long Island Bar every time).

Another thing that happens is that your friends, by osmosis, suddenly get super into having dinner parties. And because you happen to both work at a food magazine and have a type A personality, you feel completely entitled to then perfectly craft—or micromanage, depending on who you ask—these dinner parties to your liking. It's just what happens.

In case it wasn't clear, I've been talking about myself here, and this is my real life. If I'm hosting in my tiny Brooklyn apartment, there's no way I'm making the entire meal myself, but I will plan the menu and delegate not only specific dishes but specific recipes to my friends. Which means that I'm always on the hunt for recipes that are delicious, beautiful, and simple enough that said friends—who pretend to be inept in the kitchen even though they most certainly are not!—can feel confident making. Which is where this tomato tart comes in. It's beyond impressive-looking, but basically all you have to do is buy frozen puff pastry, thaw it, poke it a couple of times, put some stuff on it and bake it.

Can't go wrong with frozen puff pastry. Can't go wrong with this tomato tart.

Photo by Laura Murray, Styling by Sue Li

But just because a recipe is easy doesn't mean that the friend you delegated it to isn't going to call you, panicking, and need to be walked through it. So here's the script. First, let’s start with the frozen puff pastry. You’re going to find it in the freezer aisle of your supermarket, by the frozen pizzas. They’ll usually come in a pack of two or four and TBH, this tart is as good leftover as it is hot, so make more than one! Oh, and it needs to thaw overnight in the fridge. This part is non-negotiable—if you try to work with it while it's frozen, it'll crack, and if you try to thaw it quickly it'll get weird and gummy. (If you're doing this coaching the day of the dinner party, tell them to go ahead make something else. Caprese, maybe?)

Moving on. You’re preheating your oven to 375°F degrees and rolling your puff pastry onto parchment paper. IMPORTANT: wax paper and parchment paper aren’t the same thing, and you don’t want your oven to become a big old smoke box. Make yourself a drink, take a big sip, and then prick the rolled out dough with a fork a few times in the center of the dough, which will allow steam to escape and help the thing keep its shape. Combine a clove of grated garlic and a tablespoon of olive oil in a little bowl, and brush this garlicky oil onto the PP. (PP stands for puff pastry, obvs.) If you don’t have a pastry brush, neither do I. Use your fingers! It’s fun, promise.

Then, you’re going to slice half of a lemon thinly and scatter those slices—rind and all, but without the seeds!—all over your PP. Use as much as you’d like, though I prefer it a little light on the lemon and heavy on the tomatoes. Use the other half of your lemon to make garnishes for Campari spritzes later and toss some torn basil onto your tart. Then you’re going to cut up your tomatoes into rounds and layer that onto your puff pastry. A little overlap is good! This is a tomato tart in case you forgot. You’re going to sprinkle with a generous amount of salt, pepper and oil and throw that bad boy into the oven. It’ll probably take about 35 minutes, but just watch for browning on the edges and bottom of the pastry! Let it cool completely before you cut into it and bring it over to my house, so all the juices have time to set into their respective seats, and grab some creme fraiche or ricotta on the way over to dollop on top.

Look at you and your tomato tart!

It’s the most perfect summer party appetizer, and a great way to spend an afternoon on the phone with a friend you're about to spend the whole evening with. Just make sure to reward her with a pitcher of spritzes when she arrives—you both deserve it.


Preparation

  1. For crust:
    1. Position rack in center of oven and preheat to 350°F. Mix gingersnap cookie crumbs, sugar, and ginger in medium bowl. Add melted butter and stir until mixture is evenly moistened. Transfer crumb mixture to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish press crumbs firmly and evenly onto bottom and up sides to top of dish. Bake until crust is firm and slightly darker in color, about 8 minutes. Cool crust completely.
    1. Pour enough cold water into medium bowl to come halfway up sides add 2 cups ice cubes and set aside.
    2. Pour 1/4 cup water into small bowl sprinkle gelatin over. Let stand until gelatin softens, about 15 minutes.
    3. Whisk 3/4 cup sugar, lemon juice, egg yolks, grated lemon peel, and salt in heavy medium saucepan to blend. Whisk constantly over medium heat until mixture thickens very slightly (mixture will coat spoon but will not be thick like curd) and thermometer inserted into mixture registers 160°F, about 6 minutes (do not boil). Add gelatin mixture whisk until gelatin dissolves and mixture is smooth, about 1 minute. Place saucepan in bowl with ice water until lemon filling is cool to touch, whisking occasionally, about 8 minutes. Transfer lemon filling to large bowl.
    4. Using electric mixer, beat whipping cream with powdered sugar in another medium bowl until peaks form. Fold 1/4 of whipped cream into lemon filling until incorporated. Fold in remaining whipped cream in 3 additions. Transfer filling to cool crust, mounding slightly in center. Refrigerate pie until filling is set, about 4 hours.
    5. Do ahead: Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep refrigerated. Let stand at room temperature 20 minutes before serving.
    1. Toss lemon peel strips with remaining 2 tablespoons sugar in small bowl let stand 10 minutes. Twist peel to form curls (see tip below). Garnish center of pie with lemon peel curls.
    2. To make lemon peel curls: Remove peel in long strips using a citrus zester or channel knife. Twist strips around chopstick to form curls, then slide curls off.

    Anna's Tomato Tart

    Place the flour and 1 teaspoon of salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Add the butter and pulse 12 to 15 times, until the butter is the size of peas. Add the egg yolks and pulse a few times to combine. With the motor running, add the ice water through the feed tube and pulse until the dough starts to come together. Dump onto a floured board and roll it into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

    Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

    Meanwhile, place the tomatoes in a large bowl. Put the parsley, basil, garlic, thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade and process until finely minced. With the processor running, pour the olive oil down the feed tube and process until combined. Pour the mixture over the tomatoes and toss gently. Set aside.

    On a well-floured board, roll the dough out to an 11 × 17-inch rectangle and transfer it to the prepared sheet pan. Don’t worry if it doesn’t fit exactly you want it to cover most of the bottom of the pan but it can be a little rough on the sides. Place a second sheet pan directly on the pastry and bake for 15 minutes. (You can also line the pastry with foil and fill it with dried beans.) Remove the top sheet pan (or the beans and foil). Using a dinner fork, pierce the pastry in many places. Bake for another 8 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned. Check the pastry during baking pierce any spots that bubble up. Allow the crust to cool for 15 minutes.

    Lower the oven to 375 degrees. Brush the mustard on the crust with a pastry brush. Sprinkle a thick even layer of Gruyère on the pastry, reserving ½ cup for the top, and sprinkle with the ½ cup of Parmesan. Place overlapping tomatoes in rows on top. If there is a little garlic and herb mixture in the bowl, sprinkle it over the tomatoes, but if there is liquid in the bowl, strain it through a very-fine-mesh strainer, discard the liquid, and sprinkle the garlic and herb mixture on the tomatoes. Sprinkle the reserved ½ cup of Gruyère and the remaining 2 tablespoons of Parmesan on top. Bake for 30 minutes.

    Cool slightly, cut into squares, and serve warm or at room temperature.

    Copyright 2016, Cooking for Jeffrey, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, All Rights Reserved



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